Overview

Overexpression of HER2, known clinically as HER2-positive disease, is observed in 20-30% of all breast cancer cases. HER2-positive breast cancer is generally more invasive, more likely to be aggressively metastatic, more apt to develop resistance to therapy, and more rapidly progressive. Fortunately, the advent of targeted therapeutic agents has vastly improved outcomes for patients with HER2-positive disease, and drug development initiatives are also ongoing. Attendees of this symposium will gain an appreciation of novel treatment approaches in HER2-positive breast cancer, including the emergence of antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) and their role in shifting the management paradigm. Safety and efficacy profiles of currently-approved ADCs will be reviewed, as will clinical data for ADCs being studied in late-stage trials. Finally, using a challenging, case-based format, symposium attendees will identify key strategies oncology pharmacists can employ in their clinical practice in an effort to combat resistance, impede progression, and ultimately, optimize treatment outcomes for patients with HER2-positive breast cancer.

Speakers

Val Adams, PharmD, FCCP, BCOP

University of Kentucky College of Pharmacy Markey Cancer Center
Lexington, Kentucky View Full Bio

Neelima Denduluri, MD

Virginia Cancer Specialists
Reston, Virginia
View Full Bio

Accreditation

CPE

In support of improving patient care, Creative Educational Concepts is jointly accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME), the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE), and the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC), to provide continuing education for the healthcare team.

This application-based activity is approved for 1.00 contact hour (0.100 CEUs) of continuing pharmacy education credit (UAN JA0007101-0000-20-006-L01-P).

Other

Creative Educational Concepts, Inc. certifies this activity for 1.00 hour of participation.

Acknowledgement

Presented by Creative Educational Concepts, Inc. (CEC) and supported through independent educational grants from AstraZeneca and Daiichi Sankyo.